Retrospective IT

HTML Emails for Nagios

Nagios HTML Email Alerts

While Nagios notification alerts are great, they sure aren’t pretty.

Since the alerts in my company will be escalated to upper management, I wanted to clean them up a bit and make them pretty. To do this, I’ll using Nagios-HTML-Email (from Voxer) and will be doing the following:

  • Install npm
  • From npm, install nagios-html-email
  • configure Nagios and test

Short and sweet… The end result, should look like this:

Nagios HTML Email Alerts Continue with reading

Nagios: Disabled Sticky Acknowledgements

Nagios Disable Sticky Acknowledgements

By default, Nagios has the box to make your acknowledgement of a service or host problem checked. I personally do not like this and prefer to sticky an acknowledgement only if needed instead of every time. In order to disable the automatic checking of this option, you’ll need to do the following:

Edit the main cgi.cfg file

nano /usr/local/nagios/etc/cgi.cfg

Now, scroll to the bottom of the file and make sure you uncomment ack_no_sticky and change the option from 0 to 1.

ack_no_sticky=1

You can also disable Send Notification, if you wish. Once done, you do not need to restart Nagios for this change to take effect.

Install Nagios 4 on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS – Part Two

Install Nagios 4 on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS - Part 2

I spent a lot of time over the past few months learning Nagios inside and out so I could monitor our infrastructure of close to 200 servers across 75+ locations. Since learning how to install and use Nagios can be daunting and intimidating to new Nagios users, I wanted to document my setup in hopes of helping others out. Please note that some of these settings are based on person preference and can be changed.

This post is part two of a four part series and will utilize Nagios version 4.2.1, Nagios Plugins version 2.13, and the NCPA client (latest versions at the time of writing).

If you haven’t already, check out Part One.

This post assumes the following:

  • A base install of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS with a static IP address
  • This post assumes you are root (i.e. sudo su – )
  • This post assumes you have Nagios installed according to part one of this series.

Continue with reading

Install Nagios 4 on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS – Part One

Install Nagios 4 on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS - Part 1

I spent a lot of time over the past few months learning Nagios inside and out so I could monitor our infrastructure of close to 200 servers across 75+ locations. Since learning how to install and use Nagios can be daunting and intimidating to new Nagios users, I wanted to document my setup in hopes of helping others out. Please note that some of these settings are based on person preference and can be changed.

This post will be split into a four part series and will utilize Nagios version 4.2.1, Nagios Plugins version 2.13, and the NCPA client (latest versions at the time of writing).

This post assumes the following:

  • A base install of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS with a static IP address
  • This post assumes you are root (i.e. sudo su – )

Continue with reading

Automatic Updates for Ubuntu

Keeping your Linux servers up-to-date isn’t that hard, but sometimes when you have a server that may not be of huge importance or may be something that you don’t necessary see too often, security and updates may be lacking. Luckily, we have unattended upgrades or, the Linux equivalent of Microsoft’s automatic updates.

It makes updating really simple. You install the package, set it to run, and forget it. This post will cover the installation and configuration of unattended upgrades on Ubuntu.
Continue with reading

Server 2003/2008 DCPromo Logon Failure

I’ve been on a roll upgrading our equipment and decommissioning old servers. Most demotions and decommissions finish without an issue, which is great. I happened to be late to the game at one of our sites that closed before I was able to come onsite for the decommission. I ended up bringing the servers back with me and they sat in a warehouse for about a month until I had time to setup a test network with a VPN back to our main site to properly demote the domain controllers.

Continue with reading